UNIDO partners SON to implement 12m euro NQI project

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rp_UNIDO.gifThe representative of United Nations Development Organisation (UNIDO), Mr. Shaukat Malik,  has said both Standards Organisation of Nigeria (SON) and  UNIDO have started the implementation of the National Quality Infrastructure(NQI) for Nigeria project, worth 12million euro.

He spoke at the World Metrology day with the theme: “Measurement in National Development” organised by SON in Lagos.

The project, which is to be funded by the European Union (EU), is aimed at  supporting  the improvement of standards and quality control agencies in order to advance the quality of products and services.

Malik said the project is to boost the competitiveness of the country’s private sector and ensure the protection of its consumers.

“We recognised that the increasing importance of metrology within globalised markets puts more emphasis on the link between costs and quality, quantity and trade,” he said.

The UNIDO Representative noted that without the use of metrology, the simplest of transactions may be open to abuse as it then becomes difficult to regulate trade.

Malik explained that the UNIDO through its NQI project, will take up the reins to finalise strategic activities to support the metrology towards international recognition.

Director-General, SON, Dr  Joseph Odumodu, said the establishment of the national metrology institute will help the country to boost her export base by providing the required confidence and reliability in the export goods.

According to Odumodu, the establishment of the institute will eliminate the incidence of inaccurate and short measures in trade, manufacturing,  export and import activities in the country

He said apart from ensuring improved health standard of the citizenry, it will also ensure safe environment by providing accuracy in measurements.

His words: “Metrology, which is the science of measurements, is key to achieving 30 Gross Domestic Product for the manufacturing sector.

 

He further said without metrology lives, would certainly be cut short, stressing that proper measurements will help reduce imprecision dominant in the health sector.