How To Turn A Job You Hate Into A Job You Love

0
1162

Even people who are relatively happy at work go through periods when they hate their jobs—for days, weeks or even months at a time. Just read between the lines of the recent obituaries of CBS newsman Mike Wallace, who died on April 7 at the age of 93. As The New York Times reported, Wallace suffered a nervous breakdown when his documentary on deception by the American military about the strength of Vietnamese enemy troops prompted a $120 million libel suit against CBS filed by Gen. William C. Westmoreland, the commander of American troops in Vietnam from 1964 to 1968. Still, after the case settled in 1985, Wallace spent more than 20 more years at CBS.

Sure, you can quit when the going gets tough, but it’s hard to do that gracefully. Seattle lawyer Wendy S. Goffe wrote eloquently about the subject in, “How To Quit Your Job Without Burning Your Bridges.” Plus finding something better in today’s tight job market can be a challenge. Thinking about self-employment? That too, has its ups and downs, as  FORBES senior editor Deborah L. Jacobs describes in “How To Make Money Without A Job.”

So let’s assume you decide to hang in there for awhile rather than bolting. Here are 10 things you can do to make things better.

1. Negotiate changes in your job description. Talk to your boss about altering your workload or the kind of work you currently do. Whether you’re overworked and overwhelmed, or completely unchallenged, your boss will understand that you will never be as productive as you could be unless something gives.

Just being able to have this conversation can be a great start to shaping something new. Your goal is to come up with a solution that will not only be best for you, but also work for your boss, your team and your organization.

2. Arrange to work with different people. Even if you don’t necessarily hate your co-workers, it can refresh your outlook on your work and the aspects of it that you hate to involve different people. On upcoming projects, ask to be teamed with individuals you don’t usually work with or even interact with around the office.

On a more informal basis, you can ask these people to react to various ideas or include them in your brainstorming sessions. Another possibility is to find out whether your organization has retained external consultants who you could team up with on certain assignments. Mix it up to get a new take on things.

3. Seek synergy. If you already know which people you enjoy working with and work well with, find more opportunities to collaborate with them. Internally this could mean asking permission to work on your next presentation with someone you know you have good chemistry with. Read more at forbes

SHARE
Previous articleThe 11 Leadership Secrets You’ve Never Heard About
Next articleBond funds could be on borrowed time
Godwin Okafor is a Financial Journalist, Internet Social Entrepreneur and Founder of Naija247news Media Limited. He has over 16 years experience in financial journalism. His experience cuts across traditional and digital media. He started his journalism career at Business Day, Nigeria and founded Naija247news Media in 2010. Godwin holds a Bachelors degree in Industrial Relations and Personnel Management from the Lagos State University, Ojo, Lagos. He is an alumni of Lagos Business School and a Fellow of the University of Pennsylvania (Wharton Seminar for Business Journalists). Over the years, he has won a number of journalism awards. Godwin is the chairman of Emmerich Resources Limited, the publisher of Naija247news.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.